St George's Park History
Port Elizabeth, South Africa

The Grounds St George's Park - Building the Duckpond Pavilion
Building the Duckpond Pavilion

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Workers at St George's Park remove trees from behind the old Delta stand. The trees were removed in order to make space for the new pavillion.

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The Eastern Province Cricket Board disclosed plans for a R26m development at St George's Park on February 27, 1992. It was expected to set the pace for international cricket in South Africa. Standing behind a model of the proposed north stand development are (from left) architect Terry Baker, EPCB president Peter van der Merwe, EPCB managing director Kevin Sutcliffe and development architect John Rushmere.

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By March 11, 1992 work at the Duck Pond End of St George's Park cricket ground had not been halted following uncertainty about finance for the R26M operation. This photograph shows the foundations of the new pavillion.Two financial institutions considered a loan of R20m and the Port Elizabeth City Council Policy and Resources Committee were to discuss a R6m loan as well.

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Sports marketing promoter George Rautenbach and his assistant, Suzanne Schoeman, survey the construction work on the new, unnamed, north-end pavillion. The stand was scheduled to be ready for the tour by India in November, 1992. Three internationals were played at St George's Park, two one-day matches and a five-day Test.

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The North Stand Development at St George's Park starting to take shape. It was expected that it would be ready for the start of the cricket season in November, 1992. The stand would offer luxury seating for cricket fans and different packages were made available, thus enabling individuals and companies to make the most of South Africa's return to international cricket.

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Work continues on the north stand development at St George's Park in Port Elizabeth. The R30m development was expected to be completed by November, 1992.

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Work progressed well on the new pavillion at St George's Park cricket ground. "What has gone up so far is the beginning of the steel superstructure that will house suites and the Duckponders' Executive Club for about 1,000 spectators," Eastern Province Cricket Board managing director Kevin Sutcliffe said. Work on the R24m project started in February and was expected to be completed early in November, 1992.

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The Duckpond Pavillion. July 15, 1992.

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The lower terrace, which will seat 4,500 spectators, takes shape in the new pavillion.

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A back view of the new duckpond-end pavillion as it nears completion.

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The Duckpond Pavillion starts to take shape. At the bottom is the lower terrace that will provide seating for the general public. The private suites are above with more terraced public seats at the top. The steel structure will support the roof.

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Cutting it fine might refer to a stroke in cricket, but it also applies to the schedule for completion of the new R23m stand at the Duckpond End of St George's Park in Port Elizabeth. It was hoped that the stand would be ready one week before the Indians played on December 9.

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Skill and concentration were the order of the day when the second of two six-ton floodlight pylons was placed onto its base on the Duckpond Pavillion at St George's Park in May, 1992.

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With the Duckpond Pavillion in the background, EP Cricket Board managing director Kevin Sutcliffe (centre) and consulting engineer Ted Anstey (right) display the SA Institute of Steel Construction Award as overall winner in the structural category. Also in the picture is consultants design engineer James Cairns.

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The Duckpond Pavilion - Present Day

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The Duckpond Pavilion during the
South Africa vs India Test match.

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The Duckpond Pavillion apruced up with its 2003 Cricket World Cup colours.

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The sightscreen at St George's Park gets it's Sahara colours at the newly named Sahara Oval St George's Park on August 8, 2004.

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